Exclusive Haint Blue Paint Color Formulas. You get a 4.75″ hand-painted circle sample board with formula printed on the back. If you go to a paint store for Haint Blue, they will pick one of their light blues and tell you it’s Haint Blue.  It is not!  Read The Legend to learn why my formulas are what you’re looking for. 

charleston haint blue

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Charleston Haint Blue and Shutter Dark Green. Light, airy, ethereal and maybe even a little mysterious. This is the pale blue you’ll find on porch ceilings across the south, but particularly prominent in Charleston. Purposefully balanced to work with a wide range of exterior color palettes. You can buy both individually or as a set. Formulas are per gallon.

Ohio Haint Blue

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Ohio Haint Blue™ Cultivated directly from the walls of one of the most haunted mansions in Ohio as seen on the TV show Ghost Adventures. Our exclusive formulas were cultivated by examining the colors once visible on the walls at Prospect Place in Dresden, Ohio. Walls which have since been wallpapered and painted over. Formulas are per gallon. 

Savannah Haint Blue

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Savannah Haint Blue™ formulas were derived directly from color chips the Savannah Historical Society reproduced and authorized for use in 1980. Formulas are per gallon.

La Maison Haint Blue

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La Maison Haint Blue™ these are formulas inspired by hues of indigo that were popular in Southeast Asia in the 19th century. A region rich with history and superstition. Found on walls throughout “The Blue Mansion” in Penang, these awe coaxing blues are complex and mystically transportive. Formulas are per gallon.

Haint Blue – The Story of Discovery

Color me always on the look out for unusual color information and stories.  I found the mystery of Haint Blue particularly fetching and what I learned did not disappoint.  In fact, I was inspired to create seven custom, authentic formulas for Haint Blue. What’s meant by “authentic” is I obtained samples from original sources and custom color matched using Sherwin Williams colorants mixed in Super Paint Exterior bases.

The grand exterior below is the Cheong Fatt Tze “Blue” Mansion.

Blue-Mansion-Penang

As a color consultant with a discriminating eye, I’m in a position to examine color specimens. The color samples and formulas offered are a window to my color adventures. Have a peek and enjoy!

The paint color names we use are trademarks of Color Strategies, LLC – since 2006. To save you some time and grief, you need to know:

YOU WILL NOT FIND THE COLORS IN ANY PAINT BRAND BECAUSE THE FORMULAS AND NAMES ARE EXCLUSIVE TO THE LAND OF COLOR.

Haint-Blue-Brown-Shutter-Pic

Haint Blue is a mesmerizing and fascinating color — a color seen on doors, shutters, entire buildings and most commonly on porch ceilings all over the world.  After learning this color and its mystic qualities were so far-reaching, I decided to explore in depth the legend of Haint Blue.

What is a “Haint”?
Haints are restless spirits of the dead who have not moved on from the physical world. They exist as non-physical in the space between our dimension and what is beyond. This type of spirit is not the uber friendly sort and you don’t want them hanging around.

What exactly IS Haint Blue?
I learned Haint Blue is a spiritual and cultural based color especially in the southern United States. Back in the day, Haint Blue was mixed as milk paint formulas using lime and whatever local pigments were available. The color was mixed in pits dug on the properties where the painters were working. Hand-crafted Haint Blue translates into a range of colors, not any one specific color.

Mysterious Haint Blue

Time has a way of keeping color records and historic structures are the archives.

NOT JUST ANY BLUE WILL DO…

The color Haint Blue is open to certain creative liberties, but that doesn’t mean the options to interpret Haint Blue are limitless. There is some — but not a lot — of gray area when it comes to Haint Blues.

Time has a way of keeping color records and historic structures are the archives.

Original Haint Blues were created the way all paints and colors were created pre industrialized paint; raw ingredients in the hands of skilled craftspeople. In addition to respecting Haint Blue’s spiritual significance, the craftsmanship required to mix it deserves proper acknowledgement as well.

It is the combination of craftsmanship and faith in the power of color that is able to reach through the spiral of time and speak from historic buildings. That magical partnership has granted us the privilege to appreciate and live the hues that are Haint Blues.

What does Haint Blue do?
Haint Blue is meant to look like water and keep the Haints out of your house making you safe from their influence. Speculation has it that the tints, tones, and shades from the blue-green to blue-violet part of the visible spectrum trick Haints. Haints can not cross water. Using Haint Blue on doors, shutters, window trim, ceilings, the whole darn structure, can fool Haints and discourage them from “crossing” into your house.

It is believed Haint Blue can fake-out insects and birds too. The story is Haint Blue looks like endless sky to the little critters and deters them from making themselves at home on your exterior. The key ingredient of lime in the milk paint formulas is what likely deterred the insects and birds, not the color itself. Modern paint formulas do not contain lime. So, I’m not convinced painting your porch ceiling blue is going to help shoo the bugs and birds — but who’s to say for sure. I do know Haint Blue is an attractive addition to most any exterior color scheme.

Ohio Haint Blue Light

Ohio Haint Blue Light – Photo Lori Sawaya

What’s the story behind Haint Blue?  Wanting to see an example of Haint Blue in person, I started searching the world wide web. My research lead me to an 1856 Italianate in Dresden, OH called Prospect Place. I had no idea it was one of the most haunted mansions in Ohio until I got there. Yes, it was an adventure!

Prospect_Place Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

The point of my visit to Prospect Place was to see walls painted Haint Blue. I was not disappointed. Prospect Place was a station on the Underground Railroad. George W. Adams, the builder of Prospect Place, was a staunch abolitionist and his servants of African origin were employees not slaves. They had quarters in the house and they painted many of their rooms a color deeply rooted in their culture. The color was Haint Blue and the purpose of my trek to Prospect Place.

Haint Blue is significant because of its power to ward off and deter spirits, particularly evil spirits. Especially interesting is that several rooms at Prospect Place have the original Haint Blue milk paint applied when the house was built in 1856. If you recall, I mentioned Prospect Place is considered one of the most haunted mansions in Ohio. Put two and two together, and one has to wonder why the servants chose to paint their private rooms Haint Blue. My guess is it had little to do with the colorway of their bedding.

Haint Blue Ghosts

Most Haunted Masnsion in Ohio, Prospect Place, source www.graveaddiction.com

I managed to get a sample from the walls thanks to George J. Adams, great-great grandson of George W. Adams. (See the picture above courtesy of www.graveaddiction.com.) The patina on these old walls was incredible. The spectrum of blues and blue-greens was stunning. You don’t see color like this in a modern day fandeck. I chose the most complex samples to duplicate and used all the color mixing know-how and best paint connections I have to keep these colors safe from time.

Savannah Haint Blue Light and Dark were used on this porch:

Savannah Haint Blue©2006 Lori Sawaya

All Rights Reserved

  • Mjmagoon

    Thank you for sharing your research.  I really enjoyed reading it.

    • funcolors

       My pleasure.  Thank you for stopping by The Land of Color!

  • Nice article about a color that I’ve seen and fallen in love with (especially the La Maison version), collecting it like a magpie.  Thanks!

    • funcolors

       Thank you, Camille.

  • Donna K

    I’ve loved the concept of “haint” blue since i first saw examples of it in New Orleans back in the late “70s. Since then we’ve spent a lot of time in Savannah where it is also prevalent. I am also am partial to the La Maison versions. Thanks for your information about the various origins and range of colors.

  • Jeffrey Hagedon

    Can these formulas be used on interior walls also? The Benjamin Moore salesman advised against it, I’m not sure why. I really want to use the Ohio Haint Blue Light in my bedroom over plaster walls. They tried to “computer” match it, but it’s not the same. The Mooregard exterior base is not good for interior use? Will the formula look the same with another base? Thanks for any information.

    • funcolors

      Hi Jeffrey,

      Yest, absolutely they can be mixed for interior. The color samples are hand-painted on one side with a formula on the other. Between those two pieces of ‘data’ any store anywhere can mix the colors in any can of base. What’s key is that the store has a professional colorist and does not rely 100% on computer matching.

      Most professional paint stores understand that computer matching is flawed and oftentimes it takes a skilled human to make a color match.

      • Jeffrey Hagedon

        Thank you very much. I’m going back to the store. The formula is for a quart, can they simply quadruple it per gallon?

        • funcolors

          Yep. Again, a professional paint store should be able to take the sample and from there get/make whatever it is you need.

  • Jessica

    How do I go about finding this color. Would love to paint my house with it? Would need about 5 gallons

  • Can you tell me the name of blue/green color that the door of 511 Broughton St is painted? My sisters and I saw it while walking in Savannah in March. I would love to paint my front door the same color but there are so many blues/greens that I do not want to guess. Thank you so much!

    • Hi Doris,

      I looked it up online. I would say the closest Haint Blue from my collection would be Ohio Haint Blue Light. Hope that helps.

  • Julie

    Recently rec’d my Haint Blue Savannah – Light sample & formula. Having my porch ceiling painted tomorrow. Am SO excited about this!! LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the history behind it, and the people behind preserving the color and folklore. Thank you!

  • anne thaler

    Just discovered your site!

  • Patti Timmerman

    The Queen of Appalachian Rock-N-Roll, Chelle Rose, wrote a very cool song about painting ceilings ‘Haint Blue’ … Enjoy!
    https://youtu.be/yPEq127O-qI

    • Celeste Martinez

      Thank you so much for this information. When travelling in the South, all the way to Key West, I was charmed by both the color and the history of the porch paint. While I live near Cleveland, I want my front porch ceiling painted Haint Blue. Just because.

  • susan

    Fascinating. I just finished reading Alice Hoffman’s novel, The Marriage of Opposites, about the family of Camille Pissarro, the impressionist painter who was born in St. Thomas in the Carribean when it was under the control of the Danish. Many things are described as haint blue and one of his mother’s favorite colors. Now I understand a lot more! Thanks!

    • Harli

      Me Too!! I so enjoyed the book and learned a lot.

  • Cindy B

    Lori, your info on Haint Blue is fascinating. My husband and I are big fans of New Orleans. Have you done any research there? We’d love to use an authentic Creole Haines Blue.

    • Hi, Cindy. I have not done any research on colors of haint blue in New Orleans, but I’d love to! Thanks for stopping by to comment.

  • Kara L

    Just found your site through Pintrest! I was looking for the perfect blue/green to paint my guest room and absolutely fell in love with the Haint Blue Savannah – Light color. I couldn’t find anything close to it on any of my paint chips so your creative paint formula wins! I bought the sample and formula and can’t wait to paint the guest room. Love, love, love the history behind this color as well. Thanks for all your research!