Welcome to The Land of Color

The Land of Color

This is Color Made Easy™

Welcome to The Land of Color
Painting samples an...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Painting samples and moving them around the room isn't helpful if it's the wrong color.

8 Posts
4 Users
1 Likes
608 Views
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
Topic starter  

That's just one reason why it's smart to use color notations.

Color notations that define and describe color appearance - color science - is an efficient framework to use to determine which colors you should invest in testing in your space.

Whether you're painting your own samples or purchasing, the process costs money - it is an investment of both time and money.

Using hue, value, chroma and LRV to navigate to paint colors that technically, tangibly relate on a color DNA level to fixed finishes and/or important elements in the space is just a smarter way to sample.

And it reduces the cost and waste of testing paint colors significantly.

Painting samples and moving them around the room isn't helpful if it's the wrong color.


   
Quote
Topic Tags
CoastalRachel
(@coastalrachel)
New Member
Registered: 2 years ago
Posts: 3
 

So true, Lori. Sampling can get dang expensive when you are searching in the proverbial color-dark for a color that "works" with your space, and that you also like.

Question: I chose BM Pale Oak for my kitchen walls with BM White Dove cabinets - that choice was based off my quartz counters which look a taupe-ish (RP, R, YR) greige mixed with off-white. 

I know Pale Oak is a warm Y that and leans YR. In this dim, north-facing kitchen this griege reads a bit less warm/beige, and leans more grey.

In the adjoining great room - which gets more sunlight than the kitchen - I'd like a slightly warmer (leans more beige) pale greige on the walls.

Should I use notations to look for a different shade that would coordinate with Pale Oak but lean more beige? Or do you think if I paint this room Pale Oak the extra natural light in there will pull it warmer/beige looking? (The great room is not super bright, but for sure brighter than the kitchen.)

I've moved sample boards of Pale Oak around in the great room but can't quite tell. Pale Oak is sure pretty, but kind of tricky in different lights.


   
Lori Sawaya reacted
ReplyQuote
House to Home Interiors
(@house-to-home-interiors)
Eminent Member
Registered: 2 years ago
Posts: 38
 
Posted by: @lorisawaya

That's just one reason why it's smart to use color notations.

Color notations that define and describe color appearance - color science - is an efficient framework to use to determine which colors you should invest in testing in your space.

Whether you're painting your own samples or purchasing, the process costs money - it is an investment of both time and money.

Using hue, value, chroma and LRV to navigate to paint colors that technically, tangibly relate on a color DNA level to fixed finishes and/or important elements in the space is just a smarter way to sample.

And it reduces the cost and waste of testing paint colors significantly.

Painting samples and moving them around the room isn't helpful if it's the wrong color.

Lori, can I put this quote ("Painting samples...") on IG and credit you as the voice of reason? 😀 Thanks.


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
Topic starter  

@house-to-home-interiors of course! 🙂

 


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
Topic starter  

@coastalrachel It depends on the sight line between rooms. If it's more open than closed, I wouldn't overcomplicate the issue and just repeat Pal Oak.

If there's a defined delineation between rooms, I'd consider another color. And that color would be chosen to go with a specific element that sets the palette - like a rug or art.


   
ReplyQuote
CoastalRachel
(@coastalrachel)
New Member
Registered: 2 years ago
Posts: 3
 

Thanks @lorisawaya. The rooms are separate except for a wide doorway, so sounds like I can use a different shade based on decor. Appreciate your input.


   
ReplyQuote
Paintinghelp
(@paintinghelp)
New Member
Registered: 2 years ago
Posts: 1
 

@lori I’m having a horrible time with our exterior paint color!  Our Sw stores around Atlanta are all on a shortage and out of stock for paint samples, and we have painters coming next week!  I ordered SW Agreeable gray and Repose and AG looks purple-ish and Repose reads blue.  I was set on AG, but not reconsidering it! Someone in my design group of Atlanta just painted their home with it, and said to be warned that it also can look very dark in rooms without much lighting, which is our bedrooms.  The SW lady at the store said to try their swatches, which are super small!, and see if Gassamear Viel sp? Or Drift of Mist would be lighter and better.  Question though, we are looking for a very neutral greige color for re-sell.  Would Drift of Mist or Gossamear read lighter without the purple undertones that Agreeable gray gives off?  Thank you!

D299CEF3 0F72 41AD A5E4 50737598DAB2

 


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
Topic starter  

Classic Gray from Benjamin Moore would be my first choice.

If you have to do Sherwin-Williams, Drift of Mist is close to Classic Gray and so is SW 9584 Mortar.


   
ReplyQuote
Share:
Scroll to Top