Welcome to The Land of Color

The Land of Color

This is Color Made Easy™

Welcome to The Land of Color
Coordinating grays,...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Coordinating grays, please help

12 Posts
5 Users
1 Likes
750 Views
KendraVicknair
(@kendravicknair)
New Member
Registered: 10 months ago
Posts: 1
Topic starter  

Hi. I’m new here. I’m painting my laundry room walls and cabinets. The trim is SW dover white and I’d love to leave that alone. The washer/dryer are white. I’m between 3 options for the walls: the current color is SW Repose Gray and I like it, but the room needs to be painted anyway, so I can change it. Other wall options are BM Gray Owl or Silver Chain. I like them both a lot. I think the Gray Owl is my favorite of the 3. It doesn’t have any odd undertones in that room, just a nice soft light gray. I want to paint the cabinets a dark gray that will coordinate with one of those three lighter grays. I ordered samplize samples of BM stormy sky, Kendall charcoal, gunmetal, steel wool, rocky coast, trout gray, and amherst gray. 

I think I like the stormy sky the best, but I’m a little afraid of it looking purple. Kendall and Amherst look a little greenish, but not bad. Trout looks a little purple. Rocky coast looks blue green. 

Can you tell me which light gray/dark gray combination would work the best? 

Thank you.


   
Quote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

Hi Kendra,

The best thing to do is organize the colors by hue family so you know what you're dealing with.

I recommend that you subscribe to The Color DNA Table https://thelandofcolor.com/color-dna-table/. Then, look up each color and write down the hue angle, hue family, value, chroma and LRV notation. Either directly on the sample or create a spreadsheet.

Next, plot each color on The Color Strategist Color Wheel. That way you'll be able to see exactly how each color relates to the other. Because the wheel literally maps out color harmony for you.

Read more about the color wheel here: https://thelandofcolor.com/color-dna-table/

I'm attaching an example of what I mean. Of course, you have a lot more colors but it's the same idea whether it's 2 or 20 colors.

plot CSCW

   
ReplyQuote
John David
(@john-david)
New Member
Registered: 10 months ago
Posts: 1
 

Thanks for all your i formation and it's really useful for me.


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

@john-david you're welcome. Let me know if you have any questions.


   
ReplyQuote
Amy Nelson
(@amy-nelson)
Active Member
Registered: 2 years ago
Posts: 9
 

@lorisawaya After we get these plotted on the wheel, I get stuck on what to do next.  Am I looking for colors that have the same Hue angle, the same Value and/or the same Chroma, so I know they make a good palette (like the Affinity fan deck color activity)? Or am I just comparing the stars on the color wheel with the Harmony wheels?  (It seems like if I did that, that is only looking at the hue angle, nothing else.) Thanks!


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

Hue, Value and Chroma are separate attributes of color.

We have scales to illustrate each individually.

The Color Strategist Color Wheel is the "scale" that illustrates hue.

When you plot colors on the CSCW, you're identifying hue families of the elements you have to work with.

You can then look at where on the CSCW those elements plot and see how they relate to each other in terms of classic color harmony relationships.

With that information you have direction about color choices going forward.

Either stay within the same hue family range or develop alternative color harmonies by choosing complementary, analogous, triadic, etc. colors.

The basic rule of thumb of how to use color relationships to create harmonious color schemes is:

Colors from the same/similar Hue Family go together

Colors with the same/similar Value go together

Colors with the same/similar Chroma go together

All three are options.

You can choose to coordinate colors based on only one attribute or you can choose to align colors on more than one attribute - it's your creative prerogative.


   
ReplyQuote
Kim Lowry
(@kim-lowry)
New Member
Registered: 10 months ago
Posts: 2
 

@lorisawaya 

Please help! We are helping our son remodel his first home and he wanted a warm gray and so we chose Anew Gray. We painted all of the cabinets anew gray: kitchen, mud bench in living room, built ins in bedroom, bathrooms etc. His home has a lot of natural light and certain times of day the cabinets look like the perfect greige and at other times they shift purple/pink. Re-painting all of the cabinets is not an option so I am trying to find a wall color that will compliment anew gray and make the shift less obvious. His trim and doors are Pure White. I subscribed to the land of color and have learned anew gray is in the Yellow Red hue family and can shift purple in unbalanced light. If I’m understanding the color wheel correctly I need to move more towards the Yellow hue family in hopes the paint color will not shift purple but I also read that yellow is opposite purple on the color wheel and the two will make each other more prominent  so this is where I am confused. Does the wall color need to be in the yellow hue family? The trim and doors are pure white. I am trying to pick a wall color and I’m having a hard time finding something that looks good with anew gray. Incredible white looks pink. 


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

Hi, @kim-lowry 

The good news is it's only happening at certain times.

One option is to ignore it. There's a chance that your brain's color constancy function will kick in in a couple of weeks. It's kind of amazing how you just don't even notice the shift any more.

That happened to me when I chose a floor from the Yellow-Red hue family only later to learn that I could not change out the LED light that was making it look pink/peach. Everywhere else is looked perfectly neutral. It was just in the kitchen when this big light was on.

After a few weeks - and most importantly after I got everything loaded back in to the space including furniture and decor - I had to really think about it in order to see the pink/peach. Decorating and finishing off the space helped A LOT.

It's kinda crazy pants how your vision system/brain works!

So. That's strategy #1. Next post is Strategy #2.


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

Strategy #2 - paint colors

If white is an option, you could just use Pure White on the wall in a matte sheen. Assuming the trim has more gloss, the difference in sheen will give the two surfaces dimension - the look will be subtle the same but different.

Two other colors to test Are Origami White and Pearly White. I pulled the Paint Color DNA for you so you can see how they are farther away from the Anew Gray and Incredible White hue family range and closer to the middle of the Yellow hue family. The idea is that they are close enough to Anew to harmonize nicely, but farther from that 'can shift purple zone'.

I'm including direct links to Samplize Peel & Stick samples for your convenience. Hope that helps!
Samplize Origami White

Samplize Pearly White

Origami

   
ReplyQuote
Kim Lowry
(@kim-lowry)
New Member
Registered: 10 months ago
Posts: 2
 

@lorisawaya Lori, thank you so much for responding to my post so quickly! I have been trying to find a wall paint color that compliments Anew Gray for weeks and have not had any luck. Your advice is super helpful and much appreciated. I am going to get samples of both Pearly White and Origami White. 

I love your website and the color DNA table. I never knew there were so many things to consider when selecting a paint color. I will use your DNA table from now on when selecting paint colors. I encourage anyone who is searching for paint colors to subscribe to your website and use the color DNA table .


   
Lori Sawaya reacted
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

@kim-lowry aww, thank you. I appreciate the kind words and your support so much. ❤️ 


   
ReplyQuote
Lori Sawaya
(@lorisawaya)
Estimable Member Admin
Registered: 2024 years ago
Posts: 164
 

You are on the right track.

The Color Strategist Color Wheel illustrates just hue angle/families.

That's why I created The Color DNA Table. That's where you can get Value, Chroma and LRV.

The Color Strategist Color Wheel is the antidote to the pain of trying to see undertones; those visual gymnastics are totally unnecessary when you can just look up the hue family.

But, like you, there are those who want to go beyond the question "what is this color [hue]?"

Think of hue, value and chroma as separate channels of color that you can tune individually. So, yes, you can choose to stay within the same hue family range to create harmonious color schemes.

But you have two other options (channels) as well: value and chroma.

For example, you can "fine tune" your hue-family-based color scheme by aligning - or contrasting - Value which is lightness and darkness.

Here's more info. 

Posted by: @lorisawaya

Hue, Value and Chroma are separate attributes of color.

We have scales to illustrate each individually.

The Color Strategist Color Wheel is the "scale" that illustrates hue.

When you plot colors on the CSCW, you're identifying hue families of the elements you have to work with.

You can then look at where on the CSCW those elements plot and see how they relate to each other in terms of classic color harmony relationships.

With that information you have direction about color choices going forward.

Either stay within the same hue family range or develop alternative color harmonies by choosing complementary, analogous, triadic, etc. colors.

The basic rule of thumb of how to use color relationships to create harmonious color schemes is:

Colors from the same/similar Hue Family go together

Colors with the same/similar Value go together

Colors with the same/similar Chroma go together

All three are options.

You can choose to coordinate colors based on only one attribute or you can choose to align colors on more than one attribute - it's your creative prerogative.

 


   
ReplyQuote
Share:
Scroll to Top